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UPDATE: 11,000 miles on my SE w/tech 2-wheel drive. Mostly highway miles with A/C on, mainly flat roads. Average MPG to date is 20.8.
 

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I have an SEL Premium and the gas mileage has steadily improved. Just drove from Kentucky to Omaha and back and was getting 24 mpg with 87 octane. When it was brand new we were getting 18-19 on ECON. It goes for it's 10,000 mile service Monday.
 

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I've been getting 19-20 Mpg on SE w/Tech steady since the beginning on mixed driving with stock equipment.

I've just installed an aftermarket air filter, expecting a small drop off going forward. For those of you who want to track their gas mileage closely, I strongly recommend the Fuelly website, I've used it for my last three cars and am a huge fan.

They do all the math and track the trends for you, also comparables against other reporting models.

2018 Volkswagen Atlas MPG - Actual MPG from 55 2018 Volkswagen Atlas owners
 

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My SEL 4Motion has seen as much as 26 on a long highway trip over several tanks to as low as 15-16 for in-town use. Overall average over 5K miles is about 19 for 60/40 city/hwy...spot on numbers vs. the ratings. This is using Costco Top Tier regular gas.
 

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I've been averaging about 22-24mpg over the long term with our SE V6 4motion, mostly in town. Road trips average 23mpg @80, [email protected] Sounds like some of you know what conservative driving is, while some of you THINK you know what conservative driving is. Google "hypermiling" for some tips! I've hit 30mpg in the Atlas doing some of the more extreme hypermiling techniques. However, it's the wife's car, so she tends to drive less efficiently, but my hypermiling mindset has rubbed off on her. All in all, she's still a very efficient driver! 🙂

Also, you guys need to be using 87 octane, top tier gas (google "top tier gas"). I prefer Shell and Chevron using exclusively these two, mostly Shell. Anything over 87 forces the engine to work harder and will create more exhaust valve deposits, both leading to a drop in MPG. Air your tires up to 4-5psi under sidewall max, accelerate gently, anticipate stoplights (unlike all the fools who get upset and stomp the accelerator to pass me as I'm coasting to the stoplight we are both headed toward...), pretend you have no brakes, drive the posted speed limit or 5 under (traffic permitting), no idling (I don't even start the car until everyone is buckled), combine all trips into a single run beginning at the furthest point and working back to the house, etc. Your best MPG mod is "adjusting the nut behind the wheel!" Check ecomodder.com too, some of them are a bit extreme, but they give good advice and are helpful! Good luck!
 

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I've been averaging about 22-24mpg over the long term with our SE V6 4motion, mostly in town. Road trips average 23mpg @80, [email protected] Sounds like some of you know what conservative driving is, while some of you THINK you know what conservative driving is. Google "hypermiling" for some tips! I've hit 30mpg in the Atlas doing some of the more extreme hypermiling techniques. However, it's the wife's car, so she tends to drive less efficiently, but my hypermiling mindset has rubbed off on her. All in all, she's still a very efficient driver! 🙂

Also, you guys need to be using 87 octane, top tier gas (google "top tier gas"). I prefer Shell and Chevron using exclusively these two, mostly Shell. Anything over 87 forces the engine to work harder and will create more exhaust valve deposits, both leading to a drop in MPG. Air your tires up to 4-5psi under sidewall max, accelerate gently, anticipate stoplights (unlike all the fools who get upset and stomp the accelerator to pass me as I'm coasting to the stoplight we are both headed toward...), pretend you have no brakes, drive the posted speed limit or 5 under (traffic permitting), no idling (I don't even start the car until everyone is buckled), combine all trips into a single run beginning at the furthest point and working back to the house, etc. Your best MPG mod is "adjusting the nut behind the wheel!" Check ecomodder.com too, some of them are a bit extreme, but they give good advice and are helpful! Good luck!
@WestB87 interesting post. I finally got around to look over the conversion chart. I believe the Gas Door reads for V6 (memory here) says 92 RON, since US uses the standard R+M/2 I only assumed 91 octane was suitable. Its been a while since I looked up the conversion charts and you are correct. The conversion of 92 RON would in fact be 87 octane. I am only getting MPG extended about 14.9. I would imagine this is my MPG issue. thanks!

I know right? All my logic in spite of the owners manual. Stubborn me!
 

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I've been averaging about 22-24mpg over the long term with our SE V6 4motion, mostly in town. Road trips average 23mpg @80, [email protected] Sounds like some of you know what conservative driving is, while some of you THINK you know what conservative driving is. Google "hypermiling" for some tips! I've hit 30mpg in the Atlas doing some of the more extreme hypermiling techniques. However, it's the wife's car, so she tends to drive less efficiently, but my hypermiling mindset has rubbed off on her. All in all, she's still a very efficient driver! 🙂

Also, you guys need to be using 87 octane, top tier gas (google "top tier gas"). I prefer Shell and Chevron using exclusively these two, mostly Shell. Anything over 87 forces the engine to work harder and will create more exhaust valve deposits, both leading to a drop in MPG. Air your tires up to 4-5psi under sidewall max, accelerate gently, anticipate stoplights (unlike all the fools who get upset and stomp the accelerator to pass me as I'm coasting to the stoplight we are both headed toward...), pretend you have no brakes, drive the posted speed limit or 5 under (traffic permitting), no idling (I don't even start the car until everyone is buckled), combine all trips into a single run beginning at the furthest point and working back to the house, etc. Your best MPG mod is "adjusting the nut behind the wheel!" Check ecomodder.com too, some of them are a bit extreme, but they give good advice and are helpful! Good luck!
@WestB87 interesting post. I finally got around to look over the conversion chart. I believe the Gas Door reads for V6 (memory here) says 92 RON, since US uses the standard R+M/2 I only assumed 91 octane was suitable. Its been a while since I looked up the conversion charts and you are correct. The conversion of 92 RON would in fact be 87 octane. I am only getting MPG extended about 14.9. I would imagine this is my MPG issue. thanks!

I know right? All my logic in spite of the owners manual. Stubborn me!
Hey, no sweat! I used to do similar things until someone dropped that same knowledge on me. I hope this helps you out!
 

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Hello all, On my 2018 Atlas V6, i am getting about 17-19 Highway and 24 on my long trips. I live in Cali and recently did a Yosemite and Las Vegas trip.
 

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15,000 miles on SE w/Tech V6 2WD. Just finished 2400 mile road trip and averaged 24 mpg. 21 mpg average on daily commute which is 80% highway.
 

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I have had my Atlas since Dec. 2017 and I have never gotten anything over 15 mpg. I mostly do low-speed city driving and on average I am getting 14 mpg. I have yet to take my Atlas on a long trip, so I can't comment on the highway mileage yet. This weekend will be my first interstate trip with the Atlas. I am eager to see what mpg I get on this trip.
Same here. I have used USA 91 and 87 and no difference. My wife is a very calm driver and 1/3 of her commute is Freeway but only a 18 mile round trip. I can get 18 since start but my extended is 14.7 mpg can't seem to get passed 15. I drive a little more aggressive but i am on eco. But still 18 advertised and i am getting 15. hmmmm. It doesn't add up. I need to do the math by trip meter and gallons to fill just to verify.

Can the Autostop feature cause worse MPGs? Would appear it would.

I call bull ****. Yes we can get 18 on city (Since start for a few miles), but our average is 15. Haven't drove far enough yet to test out Hwy. very frustrated but not a deal breaker for us.
 

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Taking a trip next weekend. Should log over 1000 miles round trip. Got the car with 400 miles due to they had to go get it from the dealer (only one with the wheels, color, seating) that I wanted. The OVER ALL avg as per the computer is 23mpg but most of that was highway. But after reading all these reviews and EVERONE who has reviewed this platform all say the same thing. It's not a sipper. Got the feeling I was right going into buying this car was, I got VW's version of the Jeep COMMANDER w/o the trail rated badge. I'm sure I got one or two laying around somewhere lol. But don't think my REAL Jeep will be impressed.
 

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Drove to the airport last night to get better half. Outside temp, mid 60's, no winds, clear. Since I had filled it up 2 days ago, about 20% of the miles were city/stop-go. Hwy speeds 60-70. No A/C going there, A/C coming back (wife just got back from HotLanta so she was still adjusting but needed some help). Bottom line, time I got home last night, car said 25.4mpg and I had burnt through 1/4 tank so far on my first fill up since I picked it up last week. When I had my 2013 Passat TDi, when I drove it, I got mid 40's city, 60 hwy. I drove hwy speeds and I didn't have a heavy foot. My kid would drive it and it might get 30 city. So, for now, it seems that it's on par with our 2011 Town&Country. Van was one year old and I got 32mpg out of driving across the UP of Michigan and got 29.7 (got a picture of that lol), on a trip out to Baltimore from Detroit and back. But I've not gotten over 24 hwy for a couple of years now and it's been tuned up, checked, blah blah blah. Nature of the beast. Yes, wish the Atlas came in the TDi form but water under the bridge. It is what it is. I didn't buy it for the fuel mileage but then again, I didn't want to buy a Hummer either. :)
 

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Just drove ~1000 miles for vacay, 100% highway, 2018 SEL 4Mo got ~25mpg (by computer)...hand calc will likely show it a little lower. I'd say it's fair to say that the Atlas gets better than estimated highway and worse than estimated city so the all-around average should be about on what VW says, 19 or so for a 50/50 split over a longer interval. The smaller tank combined with somewhat low mpgs and a gas light on at 16 gal with ~2.5 left yields a perceived "OH MY GOD THIS GETS THE WORST MILEAGE" but if you do the math, it's dead on.
 

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Here you go - the KarstGeo definitive guide the Atlas mpgs:

MPGs. A hot topic here. Long post warning.

Summer/winter. Your mpgs are lower in the winter. This is due to several factors but one of the large ones is winter-blend fuels and longer warm-up periods for your car to reach operating temp (cars run more gas per unit air volume when cold – “richer”). People also tend to idle their cars longer in the winter to warm them up which eats gas. The manual has a nice graph showing the lower mpgs in the winter vs. summer.s driven by the gallons and you get mpg. The vehicle also calculates this for you (and an associated estimated range/miles to empty) based on the fuel being used but this is often not accurate and seems to be a sticking point with many owners. It works great when the driving is all the same (i.e. highway cruising) but not so great around town when the mpgs can vary wildly over a single drive – should it calculate the fuel usage based on the consumption when you gunned it at the last stop light or cruising at 35 on a secondary road? What about excessive idling in traffic where you are making zero mpg? It does it’s best but it’s an estimate and you should always hand-calc for accuracy.

You shouldn’t even bother with mpg discussions until you have a few thousand miles on your Atlas; the engine internals are new and tight and the vehicle’s mpgs will improve over that period – this is with all cars.

Looking at single tanks or single drives isn’t the way to look at mpgs – it’s just as snapshot. Long term (1000 miles) or over an oil change interval is the way to do this and will give you much more accurate assessment of your vehicle’s mpgs. Again, fuelly is a great resource for this.

The motor oil you use will have some impact - lighter weight oils will net a little better mpgs. The Atlas is typically using a 5W40 VW502.00 approved oil. You may find an 0W30 that is thinner overall and meets the same approval but it’s expensive and hard to find. I call this a waste of time in terms of improving mpgs. The manual does call this out as a way to maximize mpgs.

Summer/winter. Your mpgs are lower in the winter. This is due to several factors but one of the large ones is winter-blend fuels and longer warm-up periods for your car to reach operating temp (cars run more gas per unit air volume when cold – “richer”). People also tend to idel their cars longer in the winter to warm them up which eats gas. The manual has a nice graph showing the lower mpgs in the winter vs. summer.

The air pressure in your tires will have a huge impact. 35 psi is the factory recommended setting. If you are driving around on lower pressures you will drop your mpgs. You should check the air in your tires once a month. Running a little more may help out but you start trading off uneven tire wear in the center at v. high pressures. The Atlas has an indirect TPMS – it won’t tell you the pressures, you need to check them old-school. A digital tire pressure gauge is $10 on the Amazon and you can top off a tire in a minute with your kid’s bicycle floor pump for a few psi. The tires you run will also impact this based on the compound/tread/weight of the tire. Most modern all-season passenger vehicle tires will be about the same but if your un high-performance summer tires or larger all-terrain tires, you mpgs will drop. Larger wheels are often heavier and will impact mpgs.

How you drive. This it the #1 impact to mpgs. In stop/go if you are heavy on the throttle, you are killing your mpgs. On the highway, speeding will kill your mpgs. You will get much better mpgs at 65 than 75. Higher rpm = more gas to the cylinders = worse mpgs. The faster you go, the more air resistance you get the worse your mpgs. Using cruise control will substantially improve your mpgs on the highway. Anticipate stops so you gradually slow down/speed up will be much better around town. This is old-school knowledge stuff here that my dad taught me and is actually listed in the owner’s manual as ways to maximize mpgs.

Eco mode. The Atlas has an eco mode but honestly, how you drive will impact mpgs more. If you aren't an efficient driver eco mode isn't going to help you.

Short trips kill mpgs. My Golf with a 1.8 will see ~19mpg for short trips….it gets up to the mid-30s on the highway and is only rated to average ~25 overall.

Engine start/stop. This is more for reduction in emissions while idling but could provide *some* mpg improvements. I'd call this somewhat worthless or on-par with the motor oil discussion above.

A/C. Using your a/c puts a load on the engine and equates to lower mpgs. On modern cars, the HVAC systems are so good that you actually get worse mpgs driving with the windows down from the aero-loss which has been proven many times. Just leave you car on auto if you have the Climatronic system. Running the a/c compressor is better (summer and winter - remember, a/c is drying the air even if you have the heat on and does provide de-fogging) and reduces the likelihood of stinky/moldy smells from not using the ac and moisture not getting cleared off the evaporator under the dash which is the source of the smell.

You can enable a handy tool using OBDEleven that will tell you how many gallons you will need to fill it up. The tank is ~18.5 gal. So if it says 12 gallons, you have ~6.5 left. 6.5 x avg mpg from the “since refuel” screen will tell you roughly what your remaining range is. For example: 15 gal on “gal to refuel” screen, avg since refuel = 24 mpg, 18.5-15=3.5x24=~86 miles left. Until empty. Your light may be on but the Atlas has a reserve that it doesn’t want you to tap so it is saying fill up with 86 miles to go!

Gallons of gas to full tweak

Long coding
Control unit: 17 Dash Board
Values:
Volume to be replenished:
Old value: No
New value: Yes

This is a big 3-row SUV and if you have the 3.6 VR6, it’s an older motor that isn’t particularly fuel efficient to make that 276hp/266 lb-ft. The difference on mpgs between those in the class getting better mpgs (Honda Pilot for example) for the average person driving ~12K miles/year is a few hundred bucks a year….certainly not worth trading your Atlas in and eating thousands in depreciation to save a few hundred a year.

The bottom line is that the Atlas can achieve the stated mpgs of 17-24 for the VR6 (17-23 4Mo/18-24 2wd). Fuelly data clearly shows this but the curve is biased to the low side looking at it suggesting, as many have noticed here, that it gets close to the stated highway mileage but lower than the stated city mileage. I have nabbed 25+ on the highway over long distances (1000 miles) and have seen as low as a 14 around town on 100% short trip tanks. The tank is small. This vehicle should have a 20 gal tank at a min to improve the range (range and mpgs are independent discussions and shouldn’t be confused with on another). The gas light comes on way too early. Nearly 3 gal left when the light comes on is a bit much. I believe that if the tank was larger and the gas light came on later many folks wouldn’t be as concerned. The average mpgs stated are just that, averages meaning there will be those on the bad side of the tail with lower mpgs and those on the good side with better b/c there is just no way to deal with all of the variables of the individual drivers/conditions.
 

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