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My car is just below 6k. Mostly parked at my house since I have been working from home since March. Bought it at the beginning of April. Took it to southern utah and Vegas in July. Regular driving no issue. About few weeks ago I started noticing when driving around 50-60 mph and applying breaks, stirring wheel would vibrate. Not shake but definitely vibration. Finally took it to the dealer and service confirmed that my rotors and breaks are the issue ((duh). They said that my rotors have been heated and they proceeded to tell me that the service guy looked at my address and I apparently live on the hill so the service rep says that to me and to my confused look she asks if I live on a hill. I proceed to tell her no I don’t live on a hill and don’t have any hills anywhere around me nor i remember driving on hills recently. She said the rotors have been heated as in warped due to applying to much of brakes going down the hill constantly. She saw my puzzled look and said it s really not uncommon to have to replace rotors and brakes so early on. I asked “under 6k”? I was short to ask her what kind of shitty rotors and brakes are on the bran new atlas that they are already failing without any excessive driving in general let alone on hills? Anyway, she was trying to tell me they are replacing it under warranty b it normally they wouldn’t -“ whaaaat”? So they are being so nice to replace the rotors and breaks under warranty or trying to hide shitty parts?
 

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Welcome to the forum Czekchik :)

Sorry to read about your issues, a couple of questions I would have (1) how many miles on your Atlas when you took delivery ? (2) what was the percentage on the Brake Pads when they were replaced ? I would not be so quick to judge VW, as most vehicle manufactures do not warrant " Wear " items and brakes are usually at the top of the list.

I remember quite a few years ago where a buddy had been driving for some time and when he got home decided to wash his car ( Not VW ) later that day he went
up to the store about five miles away and noticed a shake when he applied the brakes, turns out when he put water on the wheels the rotors were hot ( he even mentioned
the steam coming off ) and the sudden temperature change warped them.

City/Short trip driving is very hard on brakes, especially with today's vehicles equipped with Automatic Overdrive Transmissions as once your foot is off the gas
the transmissions stay's in a higher gear until a selected speed is achieved to automatically downshift. so in city driving most drivers are on the brakes sooner and more frequently.
I choose to use my Automatic Overdrive in the Manual mode so I control the downshifts allowing me to stay off the brakes as much as possible, unless I'm consistently
over 50mph I do not allow the higher gears to be engaged.


The Good news is that your back on track !

Again, Welcome ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey! Thanks so much for your input. I am picking up the vehicle today so i ll ask about the break percentage. Honestly breaks I can understand but the rotors puzzle me. I am very easy on my car, in fact both my husband and I drive it in manual especially with any downhill exactly for the reason you describe. To stay off the breaks as much as possible and to control the vehicle speed with the engine rather than breaks anywhere. I can’t remember the exact mileage when I purchase the vehicle but i ll look at the paperwork tonight but I want to say it was definitely no more than 100 miles. I also do wash my car but I can’t recall that I d take it to the manual Carwash right after a ride with heated wheels. At this point I can definitely wonder what and how it really happen but in my 20 years of owning numerous bran new cars and in fact having others where we rode them harder than usual and never did this happen to any of them under 6k miles. Thanks again, I am definitely grateful it s covered under warranty but honestly it gives me little sour taste in my mouth. Thanks again and have a great day
Welcome to the forum Czekchik :)

Sorry to read about your issues, a couple of questions I would have (1) how many miles on your Atlas when you took delivery ? (2) what was the percentage on the Brake Pads when they were replaced ? I would not be so quick to judge VW, as most vehicle manufactures do not warrant " Wear " items and brakes are usually at the top of the list.

I remember quite a few years ago where a buddy had been driving for some time and when he got home decided to wash his car ( Not VW ) later that day he went
up to the store about five miles away and noticed a shake when he applied the brakes, turns out when he put water on the wheels the rotors were hot ( he even mentioned
the steam coming off ) and the sudden temperature change warped them.

City/Short trip driving is very hard on brakes, especially with today's vehicles equipped with Automatic Overdrive Transmissions as once your foot is off the gas
the transmissions stay's in a higher gear until a selected speed is achieved to automatically downshift. so in city driving most drivers are on the brakes sooner and more frequently.
I choose to use my Automatic Overdrive in the Manual mode so I control the downshifts allowing me to stay off the brakes as much as possible, unless I'm consistently
over 50mph I do not allow the higher gears to be engaged.


The Good news is that your back on track !

Again, Welcome ;)
 

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Hey! Thanks so much for your input. I am picking up the vehicle today so i ll ask about the break percentage. Honestly breaks I can understand but the rotors puzzle me. I am very easy on my car, in fact both my husband and I drive it in manual especially with any downhill exactly for the reason you describe. To stay off the breaks as much as possible and to control the vehicle speed with the engine rather than breaks anywhere. I can’t remember the exact mileage when I purchase the vehicle but i ll look at the paperwork tonight but I want to say it was definitely no more than 100 miles. I also do wash my car but I can’t recall that I d take it to the manual Carwash right after a ride with heated wheels. At this point I can definitely wonder what and how it really happen but in my 20 years of owning numerous bran new cars and in fact having others where we rode them harder than usual and never did this happen to any of them under 6k miles. Thanks again, I am definitely grateful it s covered under warranty but honestly it gives me little sour taste in my mouth. Thanks again and have a great day
Your Welcome ;)

Be sure to ask how much percentage of the brake pads was there and just how ' Glazed ' they are. they will have this information for the Warranty paperwork to be submitted.
also have them show you the parts including the rotors and while your into it ask about the condition wheel bearings, did they look at the rear brakes ? and test drive it before you sign anything.

I would not be concerned moving forward, things happen and they stepped up and took care of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Will do. They actually sent me a video with the tool they use to pin how uneven the rotors were. But i will def ask
About the breaks. Still not clear whether they replaced those since the tech briefly mentioned in the video that they had substantial padding left and then mainly focused on showing me and talking about rotors but I will ask for sure. As far as the breaks they said yesterday it was only the front ones but i ll make sure i ll ask about the rear too. Again thanks so much or being really helpful. This is the first time Something like this ever happened on my new car so good to hear others ideas and experiences. Have a great day

Your Welcome ;)

Be sure to ask how much percentage of the brake pads was there and just how ' Glazed ' they are. they will have this information for the Warranty paperwork to be submitted.
also have them show you the parts including the rotors and while your into it ask about the condition wheel bearings, did they look at the rear brakes ? and test drive it before you sign anything.

I would not be concerned moving forward, things happen and they stepped up and took care of it.
 

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Rotors can warp from a variety of conditions and issues. Typically getting really hot then rapid cool down. Could be a hard braking issue, to hitting the brakes hard and then driving through a puddle. It is not just constant mountain/hill driving. Either way, having your rotors turned is fairly easy usually fairly inexpensive. If you have ever changed brakes or want to try (assuming you are getting nowhere with the dealer - p.s. I really doubt they will warranty claim them) then you can remove them yourself and take them to a local Napa. Call before hand, but most in my area will turn them for you and can usually do so while you wait (once again call around and before hand to be certain). My local Napa used to charge $10 per rotor. Now, when I do my brakes, I just completely change the rotors out instead of turning them as they are usually pretty cheap.
 

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Rotors can get deposits from the pads and it's a very common occurrence - they aren't actually "warped"....just pad material bedded to the rotors unevenly is all. Mine did this and I swapped out the f. pads/rotors at about 20K...just DIY'd it with nicer aftermarket rotors/pads. Another way some get rid of this is to re-bed the pads and is what I would suggest for you. Get going 60mph and bring it to about 10mph 5 times in a row one after the other then let them cool by driving without applying the brakes for a few minutes.
 

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My car is just below 6k. Mostly parked at my house since I have been working from home since March. Bought it at the beginning of April. Took it to southern utah and Vegas in July. Regular driving no issue. About few weeks ago I started noticing when driving around 50-60 mph and applying breaks, stirring wheel would vibrate. Not shake but definitely vibration. Finally took it to the dealer and service confirmed that my rotors and breaks are the issue ((duh). They said that my rotors have been heated and they proceeded to tell me that the service guy looked at my address and I apparently live on the hill so the service rep says that to me and to my confused look she asks if I live on a hill. I proceed to tell her no I don’t live on a hill and don’t have any hills anywhere around me nor i remember driving on hills recently. She said the rotors have been heated as in warped due to applying to much of brakes going down the hill constantly. She saw my puzzled look and said it s really not uncommon to have to replace rotors and brakes so early on. I asked “under 6k”? I was short to ask her what kind of shitty rotors and brakes are on the bran new atlas that they are already failing without any excessive driving in general let alone on hills? Anyway, she was trying to tell me they are replacing it under warranty b it normally they wouldn’t -“ whaaaat”? So they are being so nice to replace the rotors and breaks under warranty or trying to hide shitty parts?
Several Atlas demo units I have driven at the time of purchasing all had warped rotors and all were between 5 and 8K km, so your service department shouldn't be that surprised that this happened.
As other mentioned, there are several reasons for them to warp, overheating, hard use... etc.. but I just found it funny that several demo units had the same issue.

My Atlas is just below 5K km and no issues yet, but given harsh Canadian winters I'm curious to see how this goes in the next few months.
 

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I've seen many posts regarding rotors and brake pads. The term warping and the misunderstanding of what is happening and what causing it.

Basically rotors do not warp. You cannot create enough heat through mechanical braking force to get the temperature to the point where they begin to misshapen and "warp" like a bicycle wheel.

In my over 35 years of driving and as a high performance instructor. I have never seen a warped rotor. However there is information that can clarify this issue and help you understand the cause and effect as well as solutions to prevent and correct.

Please read the two links below as they are pretty much the gold standard on this subject.

A short article by autoblog and YourMechaniic

A longer detailed technical white paper By Carroll Smith, Consulting Engineer at StopTech

The too long didn't read answer is warping really refers to the flat surface of the rotor becoming uneven. Heat is the number one cause of this, and can cause warping in more than one way:
1. Glazing the brake rotor with material from the brake pad.
2. Wearing down the surface of the rotor and making harder spots in the metal stay slightly raised off the surface.
 

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Welcome to the forum Czekchik :)

Sorry to read about your issues, a couple of questions I would have (1) how many miles on your Atlas when you took delivery ? (2) what was the percentage on the Brake Pads when they were replaced ? I would not be so quick to judge VW, as most vehicle manufactures do not warrant " Wear " items and brakes are usually at the top of the list.

I remember quite a few years ago where a buddy had been driving for some time and when he got home decided to wash his car ( Not VW ) later that day he went
up to the store about five miles away and noticed a shake when he applied the brakes, turns out when he put water on the wheels the rotors were hot ( he even mentioned
the steam coming off ) and the sudden temperature change warped them.

City/Short trip driving is very hard on brakes, especially with today's vehicles equipped with Automatic Overdrive Transmissions as once your foot is off the gas
the transmissions stay's in a higher gear until a selected speed is achieved to automatically downshift. so in city driving most drivers are on the brakes sooner and more frequently.
I choose to use my Automatic Overdrive in the Manual mode so I control the downshifts allowing me to stay off the brakes as much as possible, unless I'm consistently
over 50mph I do not allow the higher gears to be engaged.


The Good news is that your back on track !

Again, Welcome ;)

I have to disagree with what you are being told by the dealer. I've already been to the "brake pad/rotor" rodeo with my Chrysler product. I have a 2011 Town and Country that had brake issues (we bought it new). They tried but failed to fix the issue from the 2009 era with thicker rotors but that didn't cure the end result. I had to get brakes and rotors replaced almost every 16,000 mi. They were so bad and had so many complaints, Chrysler warrantied them the first replacement and then warrantied 50% the second set replacement. All of that before 60,000 MI, I had 2 COMPLETE brake jobs. When I got to the upper 60's, and the warped came back, I went to my local mom-pop mechanic. He put after market rotors and pads. That was 50k miles ago. ;) Now my standard for breaks are from my 2009 Jeep liberty that didn't have its first brake job till it hit 68,000 mi. But I did put titanium rotors and ceramic pads on it and now that it's got 120k miles and the same pads/rotors says a lot about after market products vs the cheap crap VW and others are putting on these cars. I really don't care how much you drive. 6000 miles and having warped rotors is unacceptable for a Volkswagen much less a $50,000 car. I had a 1984 Volkswagen Jetta that ran the same rotors for over 150,000 mi. So either they're sticking crap on these cars (which IMO is what they are doing) or there's something terribly wrong with the metal they're using. I got the feeling they're buying them from the same place Chrysler gets their rotors. There's no way to candy coat this, these cars are not living up to Volkswagen standards with all these nickel dime issues that you would expect to find on a car costing half the price. And even though my 2019 Atlas SEL-P is my 4th VW (81, 84 (drove for 15 years), 2013 and now the 19), I doubt I will buy another. And based on what people have been saying about the brand, I've not been recommending it. Heck, my 26 year old daughter was looking to BUY her next NEW car. She asked about VW. I told her to move on elsewhere.She ended up ordering a loaded 2021 Jeep Compass Trailhawk. Only bad thing, she has to wait 6-8 weeks for them to build it. Don't get me wrong, I really like our Atlas and have not experienced some of the little (or big) things others have reported but I have a outstanding dealership that took care of us with our 2013 Passat TDi (and during it's buy back) and gave us a great deal with the Atlas. It's only got 9600 miles but it's all hwy, in some crappy weather but our brakes are fine. When they do go bad and it's all on me to pay for, I'm going for after market titanium rotors and ceramic pads.


And though related to brakes, who else got the USA Maintenance for all Model Year 2019 VW's?

It reads:
Time Dependent Maintenance Items:
*Brake Fluid Change: 3 years from the vehicle's original in-service date then every 2 years after, regardless of mileage.
Brake Fluid Replacement:

*The brake fluid must be replaced after 3 years of use, from the vehicles original in-service date, regardless of mileage, then every 2 years thereafter, regardless of mileage.

Looks like the "in service date" is the key here. Looked at the maintenance book. if it sits for 2 years, you change it anyway.

Anyone had a fluid change? Price?
 

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I've seen many posts regarding rotors and brake pads. The term warping and the misunderstanding of what is happening and what causing it.

Basically rotors do not warp. You cannot create enough heat through mechanical braking force to get the temperature to the point where they begin to misshapen and "warp" like a bicycle wheel.

In my over 35 years of driving and as a high performance instructor. I have never seen a warped rotor. However there is information that can clarify this issue and help you understand the cause and effect as well as solutions to prevent and correct.

Please read the two links below as they are pretty much the gold standard on this subject.

A short article by autoblog and YourMechaniic

A longer detailed technical white paper By Carroll Smith, Consulting Engineer at StopTech

The too long didn't read answer is warping really refers to the flat surface of the rotor becoming uneven. Heat is the number one cause of this, and can cause warping in more than one way:
1. Glazing the brake rotor with material from the brake pad.
2. Wearing down the surface of the rotor and making harder spots in the metal stay slightly raised off the surface.

I had a jeep once where the pads seized down onto the rotor. Got so hot, it melted the brake line, melted the springs. First hint was it was pulling to the right. Made it home and had smoke coming from the front wheel. Wheel was so hot, couldn't touch it. I was standing to the side, about 30 feet way, sprayed water on the the tire/wheel and it sizzled really bad. Thank god it didn't blow (thought of that after the fact). Though it over heated the rotor, it didn't warp. That was on one of my Jeeps and was a titanium rotor/ceramic pads. The problem was a frozen caliber (that's what I was told). Lucky I didn't blow the **** thing up with the water. Lessons learned.
 

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I have to jump in here. Rotors do warp, based on the amount of heat treating (hardness) and other variability due to other things like amount of "stuff" that is in the alloy. There is no alloy specification when you buy a rotor. Buy cheap, you usually get cheap, although going to a material like titanium seems a bit over the top. I can see using it for weight reduction like racing, since the density of titanium is very low, but I don't see the value. Check out the cost of titanium alloys and you will see.
 

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I have to jump in here. Rotors do warp, based on the amount of heat treating (hardness) and other variability due to other things like amount of "stuff" that is in the alloy. There is no alloy specification when you buy a rotor. Buy cheap, you usually get cheap, although going to a material like titanium seems a bit over the top. I can see using it for weight reduction like racing, since the density of titanium is very low, but I don't see the value. Check out the cost of titanium alloys and you will see.
I have to jump in here. Rotors do warp, based on the amount of heat treating (hardness) and other variability due to other things like amount of "stuff" that is in the alloy. There is no alloy specification when you buy a rotor. Buy cheap, you usually get cheap, although going to a material like titanium seems a bit over the top. I can see using it for weight reduction like racing, since the density of titanium is very low, but I don't see the value. Check out the cost of titanium alloys and you will see.
The rotors on my Jeep were not much more then non. Based on abuse traction control, mud, sand, lots of water that I deal with, I'll pay the extra to not have to replace my hardware everytime I hit a mud puddle. 😏
 

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You didn't have titanium rotors on your Jeep, not actually made from titanium. That might be what they were called by the manufacturer similar to silver, gold, platinum as commonly used to show the different "grades" of pads/rotors.
 
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