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My 2021 v6 atlas manual says to use regular octane fuel. Is there any real benefit to using high octabe? Is it still better to use high octane vs regular or is it just a waste? Thanks
 

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Welcome to the forum Yeshia :)

You'll get tons of different opinions on this, you can use the sites user friendly ' Search ' feature for more details(y)

In my opinion stay with the recommenced fuel type during the warranty period. ;)
 

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Per my understanding of octane ratings and I'm not an expert however I have been around for a while.

If the Atlas is rated for 87 there is no benefit to moving to 93 or higher. Higher octane is used to combat predetonation which is more so related to higher compression motors or turbo cars which have high cylinder pressure due to the turbo. 93 octane will burn mostly the same in the Atlas that is rated for 87 and you will see no benefits to your daily driving.

From Google
Octane rating is a measure of a fuel's ability to resist 'knock. ' The octane requirement of an engine varies with compression ratio, geometrical and mechanical considerations, and operating conditions. The higher the octane number, the greater the fuel's resistance to knocking or pinging during combustion.
 

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Been discussed ad-nauseum online here/FB groups/vortex - I will say this and not sure where I put it (could be here if you search) - I posted some timing logs with both 87 and 93 in my Atlas (3.6 VR6). You get less timing correction using premium from my data which will yield some additional power but this will be at the higher-rpm range that most don't use and the extra cost will just not be worth it for 95% of drivers. Perfectly safe using 87 in the Atlas - it's what I use.
 

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Here are my logs - clearly more timing correction on 87 which means you aren't getting the max power available. You will sometimes see the manufacturer handle this when they present power numbers with a * - power figures obtained using premium fuel. Note that for both pulls, variables were as close as I could get them w/r to temp, road, fuel type/station, etc. etc.

87
93
 

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87 but use Top Tier fuel. This will help slow carbon build up on the valves due to it being a GDI engine. Shell, Exxon, BP, Valero and some others use Top Tier Fuel.
 

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87 but use Top Tier fuel. This will help slow carbon build up on the valves due to it being a GDI engine. Shell, Exxon, BP, Valero and some others use Top Tier Fuel.
Top Tier while certainly the best standard in gas to use, has zero to do with carbon build-up on the backs of the intake valves b/c the fuel never touches them in a DI engine.
 

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I am aware the gasoline doesn't pass over them. The Top Tier Gas helps keep the carbon build up down nonetheless. That's from my reading on it.
 

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I am aware the gasoline doesn't pass over them. The Top Tier Gas helps keep the carbon build up down nonetheless. That's from my reading on it.
How exactly if it doesn't touch them? It's not doing a thing to the valves - only the injectors themselves (a positive!). Folks have debated this issue in online forums and social media for a long time including fuel type, oil quality, "Italian tune ups" and catch cans. None of it will prevent some build-up from happening on the back of the intake valves in a DI engine with no port injection to get some fuel/cleaners on the back of the intake valves. Most modern DI engines are not having issues like the earlier engines had and at worst, if you keep it long enough and have misfires/issues related, you get a walnut blast. I realize some bits online will reference Top Tier as helping but it doesn't....it physically can't.
 

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There is plenty of literature on the subject available on the internet. I encourage you to read it for yourself and formulate your own opinion based on it.
 

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There is plenty of literature on the subject available on the internet. I encourage you to read it for yourself and formulate your own opinion based on it.
I have and my comments are based on it. For general combustion chamber cleanliness including carbon build-up...yes. Back of intake valves in a DI engine that the fuel never touches...no. Just not much you can do fuel-wise/additive-wise on a DI engine to prevent it from getting some carbon on the backs of the intake values unfortunately but for sure, use Top Tier-branded fuels.
 
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